Tuesday, July 29, 2014

D2L series

Come and join us next week for a feast of D2L workshop series! 
You may register for either of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu). 

D2L1
When: Monday, August 4, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This introductory course will instruct you with on overview of D2L, including how to access and activate a course, how to customize your course, and how to manage course content.

D2L2
When: Tuesday, August 5, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This class explains how to set up and manage your gradebook, how to enter and export grades, and how to utilize the classlist for emailing students and viewing user progress.

D2L3
When: Wednesday, August 6, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This course will teach you how to use communication tools in D2L, including course calendar, news item, pager, and discussion.

D2L4
When: Thursday, August 7, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This course will discuss the purpose and use of the Dropbox tool and how to create, edit, and grade a quiz.

D2L5
When:Friday, August 8, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This course explains the user progress features of D2L, including: student statistics for discussions, content and dropboxes, as well as quiz analytics.


Thursday, July 24, 2014

Copyright and Fair use

How does copyright apply to the courses I teach? How to avoid copyright pitfalls when using media and other materials in your online course?
Hope this presentation prepared by our university librarians and Eric Mosterd from Center for Teaching and Learning could be of help!


Invitation to Participate in USD's First MOOC on course design

Hi folks, 

The CTL is excited to offer you a brand new way to learn about teaching.  “Don’t Panic!  The Professor’s Guide to Teaching:  Course Design” is a four-week MOOC that will help participants develop interesting, engaging classes that will provide students with opportunities for truly significant learning.  Information for this course may be found at  https://www.canvas.net/courses/don-t-panic-the-professor-s-guide-to-teaching-course-design .  The course will run from September 8 through October 7.  We anticipate that successful completion will take about 2 hours a week.  Participants who finish the course within the specified guidelines will receive a Certificate of Completion.

Although this MOOC is available worldwide, we have developed it specifically as a way to help USD distance faculty and graduate students.  We will host additional on-campus “meet-ups”, and are always available to you for greater information or 1:1 pedagogical and technological assistance.

This is an exciting first for the CTL, and we look forward to sharing our experiences with the rest of the university community.

Sincerely,


Bruce (and the whole CTL Team!)

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Social Media in the Classroom: Taking Facebook as an Example

Created by: Carlee Andress & Ryan Los, Graduate Associates for the Center for Teaching and Learning
Most college students have to admit – they hate homework and studying through group assignments. However, the truth is that they like to learn through social media.  Students are not creatures of isolation, but rather creatures of convenience and getting 6 different schedules to match, conquering 75 pages of text, coming to mutual understanding of the content, and then finally producing an A+ power point presentation is not exactly convenient!
People in general learn best when it is fun and interesting. Our parents had the newspaper thrown at their door step every morning, and so they enjoyed a daily dose of reading and learning over a cup of morning coffee. Similarly, students read Buzzfeed, blogs, and Facebook posts whenever they want (even multiple times a day), because it is virtually thrown at their fingertips.
Professors now have an incredible opportunity to implement course work and classroom information onto a Facebook Course page; professors can access and contribute to the same programs that students love to use, which can potentially make homework and group assignments more useful and convenient for their students. As a professor, you could be asking yourself, “how could this work” or “what would this look like” or maybe even doubting it altogether with an opposing response of “my students wouldn’t get their work done even if I posted it on their Facebook page”. However, many professors have utilized Facebook for their course and the results have been outstanding.
Even now students are coming together to learn topics from class through Facebook and other forms of social media. Picture this: Monday and Wednesday’s lecture was a bit overwhelming and boring. Most of the students tried reading the text, but they said the information still doesn’t make sense. There is a test coming up, and all of the sudden the entire class is in the same boat – extreme panic. Prior to options of social media being made available, students would have lined up at the office door during office hours, but it is no longer this way.
Today students will watch videos and other lectures on YouTube. When a student finds a quality video, they will message it to the whole class through Facebook.  Another student will get lecture notes from a different university professor and can then post it to her classmates on Facebook. A different student will look up scholarly journal articles and post them, where? That’s right – on Facebook. Students are already using Facebook to supplement lectures and text books, because the students learn when it is easy and convenient, and Facebook is just that.
It may be helpful for professors to start a Facebook page for their students. This way all of the students can easily add links and posts that they find interesting and helpful. The professor can also post information, add comments, and direct students to videos, pictures, and professional websites that weren’t covered in class. The most beneficial learning tool a professor could use in the new age of social media is one that is convenient - since Facebook is widely accepted and easy to use, help your students by starting a course Facebook page today.
To begin creating a Facebook page for your class, please view the following link: http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/teachers-guide-to-creating-facebook.html
As always, the CTL is here to help and answer any questions you may have. Please do not hesitate to email ctl@usd.edu, call 605-677-5411, or drop by McKusick Room 107!
The CTL is dedicated to the development of extraordinary teaching and learning at the University of South Dakota.

References
Educational Technology and Mobile Computing. (2014). Teacher’s Guide to Creating Facebook Group for Students. [Website] http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/teachers-guide-to-creating-facebook.html
           Facebook Inc. (2013). Introducing a Facebook Guide for Educators and Community Leaders. [Website] https://www.facebook.com/notes/facebook-safety/introducing-a-facebook-guide-for-educators-and-community-leaders/625839830770136
Tomassini, J. (2013). Teachers Gravitate to Social Networks Tailored for Educators. Education Week [Website]  http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/01/09/15social_ep.h32.html 

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

CTL workshops July 21-August 1


Hi folks, summer can be a perfect time to come in to the CTL and brush up on your technology skills.  We continue to offer 1:1 assistance on pedagogical technology, and are offering the following workshops the next two weeks.  You may register for either of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu). 

D2L One Hour Mini Workshop
When: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This workshop will provide you a brief introduction to the basic process of setting up a D2L course. Our follow-up D2L1-5 workshop series in Aug will provide you in-depth information about each D2L feature. 

TurnItIn
When: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Where: MT110
Turnitin is the leading plagiarism detector and is integrated with D2L. This class will teach you how to view originality reports and use grademarks to leave feedback.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

CTL workshops July 2-July 16

Hi folks, summer can be a perfect time to come in to the CTL and brush up on your technology skills.  We continue to offer 1:1 assistance on pedagogical technology, and are offering the following workshops the next two weeks.  You may register for either of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411. 

SMART Board Basics
Wednesday, July 2, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM   MT110
Join us to learn the basics of SMART Board and classroom techniques and use.

Google Docs
Wednesday, July 9, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM    MT110
In this Google Docs workshop, you will explore the basic uses of collaborative writing technologies to improve group projects. You will learn how to create, edit, upload, and share a Google document.

Google Sites
Wednesday, July 16, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM   MT110
This workshop will cover the main features of Google Sites, a collaborative web space and portfolio tool. Google Sites can be used to create simple webpages that can be edited by multiple users. This tool has been used by faculty to allow students to create portfolios as well as facilitating group work. Sites can also be used as a simple replacement for blogs or wikis.

If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu). 


The CTL is dedicated to the development of extraordinary teaching and learning at the University of South Dakota.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Summative vs Formative Assessment

How can we evaluate our students' learning and our own teaching?What are the differences between these two major types of assessment: formative and summative assessments?  Hopefully this nice visual chart created by Med Kharbach could give you some ideas...


Thursday, June 19, 2014

Presentation Tips

Tips for making powerful presentations from Jennifer Austin, Online Education Manager at University at Buffalo.

You can view either a slide version from Slideshare

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

CTL workshops Jun 16-27

During the next two weeks, we will be offering a Microsoft Excel workshop series. Come join us! You may register for either of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.

Excel 1 and 2
Wednesday, June 18, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM  MT110
This workshop will guide you through the fundamentals of creating and working with Excel spreadsheets. We will also take a closer look at charts and graphs in Microsoft Excel.

Excel 3 and 4
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM MT110
This workshop will cover formulas, functions, and autofill features. We will also work with PivotTable reports. This feature allows you to easily explore the same data in different ways and extract meaningful information from the data.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

FREE WEBINAR: Fast-Track Assessment Planning and Gain Powerful Outcomes Results

Tuesday, June 17, 2014
11:00 a.m. PT, 2:00 p.m. ET

Accountability and assessment are the hot buzzwords traveling throughout the higher education stratosphere, sparking much discussion. According to Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) President Judith Eaton, the future of assessment and accreditation has “been driven by the emphasis on accountability and public demands for evidence of student achievement from colleges and universities.” The expectation for evidence is mounting from all corners. Institutions must be ready to implement assessment plans to meet this challenge soon, but the most effective adoption demands support from both faculty and administrators, who may not have a common view of solutions. Fostering a culture of assessment can capture both internal support and external evidence to lead to success.

This webinar will feature Javarro Russell, Ph.D., Senior Research and Assessment Advisor for the Higher Education division at ETS; Norm Bryan, Ph.D., Director of Institutional Research and Assessment at Presbyterian College; and Eric Linden, Ph.D., Director of Assessment, Touro College and University System.

In this webinar, speakers will review research into effectual assessment planning, discuss strategies for developing or optimizing the assessment plan, and share best practices on how institutions are successfully creating a culture of assessment and gaining powerful outcomes results that demonstrate program effectiveness. 

This free webinar is sponsored by ETS and hosted by The Chronicle of Higher Education. All content presented during the event is provided by ETS. 

Click here to register for this event.

Friday, May 30, 2014

CTL workshops Jun 2nd to Jun 13th

Collaborate 
Tuesday, June 3, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, MT110
Collaborate is a web conferencing software that can be used for student presentations, live lectures, virtual office hours, and group work. This tutorial discusses how to create a Collaborate room in D2L, how to add and manage attendees for the room, and how to manage archived room recordings.

Psych Data  
Wednesday, June 11, 2014 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM, MT110

This course teaches you how to create a PsychData survey, administer data collection, and access survey results.

You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.   

If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu). 

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Improving Student Retention in Online Learning -- a free webinar from Academic Partnerships

Tuesday, June 10, 2014 12:00:00 PM CDT - 1:00:00 PM CDT

Online learning continues to grow and make up a larger percentage of enrollments in higher education. However, over the years, institutions often report higher attrition rates for online courses than traditional face-to-face courses. As enrollments in online courses increase and online learning becomes a larger part of institutions' long-term planning, faculty and administrators are confronted with finding ways to improve retention in online courses and online programs. In this free webinar, presented by Academic Partnerships, the literature on attrition in online learning will be discussed as well as various strategies used to improve student retention in online learning.

Click here to register.

Patrick Lowenthal is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Technology at Boise State University where he teaches in a fully online graduate program. Prior to joining the faculty full-time, Patrick spent a couple of years as an instructional designer at Boise State. Before moving to Idaho, Patrick worked as an Academic Technology Coordinator at the University of Colorado Denver as well an assistant professor at Regis University. Patrick is interested in problems of practice with teaching and learning online. He researches how faculty and students communicate using emerging technologies and specifically how they establish presence and community in online learning environments.

Learn more about Patrick at http://go.pardot.com/e/27982/2014-05-20/wb278/839070455.