Wednesday, September 10, 2014

CTL-Sept 15-19: P&T Strategies, Serving Student Veterans and more!

Hi folks!  We have a wonderful lineup of events for you next week, from information regarding promotion and tenure to how to better serve our student Veterans.  We continue to offer 1:1 assistance on D2L and other pedagogical technologies.  You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).


Thursday, September 4, 2014

Inclusive Excellence in the Classroom

Tips for success in relation to diversity in the classroom
Prepared by Jesús Treviño, Ph.D., Senior Diversity Officer and Associate Vice-President for Diversity, Office for Diversity/Office of the President, University of South Dakota and the Center for Teaching and Learning

DIVERSITY IS BOTH AN OPPORTUNITY AND A CHALLENGE.
In considering campus diversity, it is clear that challenges and opportunities manifest themselves throughout the institution, but in particular the college classroom. One of the challenges of diversity involves situations where faculty and students continue to experience conflict and tension particularly related to the different views and backgrounds represented in the classroom. Examples of these types of conflict include a heterosexual student exclaiming in class that gays and lesbians do not have a right to exist and refers to the Bible to support their argument. Or a faculty member asking the only Latino in the classroom to educate the rest of the class on the topic of Mexican immigration patterns, a topic with which the student is not very familiar. Similarly, three male students continuously disrupting the class by directing sexist comments at a female teaching assistant and an instructor asking a Veteran to share her traumatic experiences in war without clearing it with the student first are also examples of the challenges that diversity poses in the college classroom. Add to these incidents of cultural and personal misunderstandings, institutional discrimination, inadequate or no training for faculty on issues of diversity in the classroom, and lack of student preparation for engaging in productive classroom discussions, and what emerges is the possibility of a tense college campus and classrooms waiting to be disrupted.

On the positive side, there are instances where faculty have used and are using diversity in the classroom as an opportunity or asset to enhance teaching and learning. Examples of this include an instructor who organizes a fishbowl discussion of male students to discuss their attitudes toward women after a student makes a controversial remark in class. Or a faculty member teaching students about the difference between a debate and a dialogue in order to have productive expressions of free speech and thereby enhancing the learning process. And finally, students receiving and learning about ground rules for classroom discussions related to respect, free speech, and personalizing the issues are also examples of using diversity as a tool for achieving desired educational outcomes. In sum, the prospects of diversity involve using multiple perspectives, cultures, languages, and other characteristics that different social identities bring to the class as an asset or a tool to create greater understanding and knowledge about these issues. This task is not easy and requires special skills and techniques.

INCLUSIVE EXCELLENCE
Inclusive Excellence requires that we create inclusive learning environments that are attentive to issues of diversity. Issues related to differences manifest themselves across all courses, assignments, curriculums, and pedagogies. The following are suggestions for addressing issues of diversity in the classroom. Professors are not required to implement these suggestions, but rather these are intended for those faculty members who want to create inclusive learning environments.

INCLUSIVENESS MATTERS
How, what, and who we teach matters when it comes to diversity and inclusiveness. The books, readings, case studies, word problems and examples presented in the classroom can either include diverse communities by drawing on the history, culture, and experiences of different groups, or they can exclude those same communities by obliterating them from the curriculum. It goes without saying that teaching tools have to be selected carefully to be sensitive and validating to diverse communities as opposed to stereotyping and offending.

DIVERSITY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM
Issues of diversity manifest themselves across the curriculum. Even in courses where it is a common belief that issues of diversity are not present, such as math and physics, not only do you have the challenges cited above, but you also have student behavioral issues related to diversity (e.g. microaggressions, conflict, misunderstandings, etc.). In any course, you will find students representing multiple groups, including race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, religion, veteran status, age, and other social dimensions found on campus. It is important to be attentive to those dynamics and how they play out in the classroom. For example some students do not want females, gay/lesbian, international, or Native Americans in their assigned work groups.

CREATING A POSITIVE CLIMATE FOR DIVERSITY
It is important to establish ground rules for dialogue, interaction, and behavior at the beginning of each course. This is critical because it will validate the students from diverse backgrounds, create trust in you as an instructor, and establish a safe space for interaction. Moreover, in case conflict emerges you can always refer the students back to the rules of engagement.

DIVERSITY STATEMENT
Include the diversity statement approved by the University Senate in your syllabus to convey your values and beliefs about diversity and inclusiveness in the classroom. “The University of South Dakota strives to foster a globally inclusive learning environment where opportunities are provided for diversity to be recognized and respected.”

DIVERSITY ASSIGNMENTS
Consider assigning projects that contribute directly to diversity and inclusiveness on campus. These are different than community service projects (which are important) in that they address diversity issues at USD and make positive contributions to the university community.

SETTING PARAMATERS
Set clear parameters when assigning projects. Make it clear, for example, that you do not have to show pornographic images in a class presentation to make the point that sexism is alive and well in our society. Ask students to include opposing perspectives in their papers or assignments as well as consensus views.

USING MISTAKES
If you make a mistake while teaching, simply apologize and move on. You can also use your mistake to educate the students by engaging them regarding assumptions, believes, or other reasons for the error. You will gain the trust of the students. (Note: Use this judiciously and sparingly).

SOCIAL IDENTITY
The social identities of each faculty member influences how students perceive and receive them. Research suggests, for example, that women of color and white women receive low teaching evaluations in those courses where diversity is the central topic. International faculty members get complaints from students about their accents. Women have to work harder than men at establishing credibility in the classroom. The issue is not that there is something inherently wrong with social identities themselves. Rather, the problem is the perceptions that are held of those identities.

UNDERSTANDING YOURSELF
A large part of understanding diversity in the classroom is getting to the groups that may be present in your classroom. Equally as important is understanding yourself as a faculty member. Getting to know your bias, hot buttons, teaching style, issues about which you are passionate, privilege, likes and dislikes, and other personal characteristics will only help you in dealing with classroom issues.

NO APREHENSION
Just because there is tremendous diversity in the classroom does not mean you should be apprehensive about it and fear that at any moment you will make a mistake. You are not expected to know the dynamics, history, and experience of every social identity in your class. Simply acknowledge that there is diversity, do your best to address issues that come up, apologize and correct mistakes whenever possible, and proceed to teach. Make an effort to educate yourself.

ACTIONS FACULTY CAN TAKE TO PRACTICE INCLUSIVE EXCELLENCE
1. Develop a new course on diversity and inclusiveness.
2. Embed diversity and inclusiveness into an existing course. 
3. Consider books or readings on or by African Americans,
Chicanas/os, GLBTIQ members, Veterans, Disability, Gender,
and other marginalized communities.
4. Mentor a female, Gay/Lesbian, African American, first-generation college, Veteran, Latino, Asian American, Native
American, or other diverse students.
5. Work to understand and establish a “safe and welcoming” classroom climate for all students.
6. Serve on a college or department diversity committee.
7. Find out what the department is doing to practice Inclusive
Excellence.
8. Start a discussion with other faculty/administrators
designed to learn more about experiences of diverse faculty
in the department.
9. Learn about and address microaggressions between
students in the classroom.
10. Learn about and address microaggressions directed at
faculty, in particular faculty of color and women.
11. Inquire about diversity and inclusiveness in discipline
related associations, conferences, and initiatives. 
12. Help recruit diverse students into the discipline. 
13. Work with Human Resources to understand how to practice diversity and inclusiveness in job searches including search committees, advertising, job descriptions, interviewing, job negotiating, etc.
14. Insert a diversity statement into a course syllabus. For example: “This course adheres to the principles outlined in the USD Diversity and Inclusiveness Statement and the concept of Inclusive Excellence by creating a safe and welcoming environment for everyone”.
15. Consider diverse learning outcomes in your course.
16. Take responsibility for addressing diversity issues in the
School or Department. Don’t assume that diversity and inclusiveness is the domain and responsibility of faculty of color, women, or other marginalized faculty.
17. Work on improving the climate in the department for yourself and everyone else.
18. Inquire about diversity efforts at the institution as a whole (e.g., recruitment of students of color, status of GLBTIQ students, Issues confronting Women Faculty, etc.)

Resources: 
  • Jesús Treviño, Associate Vice-President for Diversity, Office for Diversity 605-677-3925. 
  • Bruce Kelley, Center for Teaching and Learning, 605-677- 6518
  • Roberta (Bobbe) Hakl, Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action 605-677-5651
  • Kim Grieve, Vice-President for Student Services and Dean of Students. 605-677-5331

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

CTL workshops September 8-12: Google docs, Google sites and more!

Hi folks, we’re off and running with a new academic term!  Now is a perfect time to come in to the CTL and brush up on your technology skills and pedagogical techniques.  We continue to offer 1:1 assistance, and are offering the following workshops next week.  You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).




Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Turn your syllabus into an infographic

Ever wondering what it might look like to have a visual summary of your syllabus? Erin McLaughlin teaches “Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric” at Notre Dame, and here she prepared a infographic of her course syllabus:

SYLLABUS WR 13300 | Piktochart Infographic Editor

Interesting in a discussion about tips, the tool, and more examples? Visit this article at:

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

CTL Workshops: Writing a Successful CTL Grant, Turnitin, Clickers, and more!

Hi folks, we’re off and running with a new academic term!  
Now is also a perfect time to come in to the CTL and brush up on your technology skills and pedagogical techniques.  We continue to offer 1:1 assistance, and are offering the following workshops next week.  You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu). 

Introduction to SMART Board
Aug 25 9-10am MT110 
Join us to learn the basics of SMART Board and classroom techniques and use.

Clickers (Audience Response Systems) 
Aug 26 1-2pm MT110  
This workshop discusses how to use clickers in your teaching. We will also introduce TurningPoint a polling software system and how to create a participant list.

TurnItIn
Aug 27 10-11am MT110 
Turnitin is the leading plagiarism detector and is integrated with D2L. This class will teach you how to view originality reports and use grademarks to leave feedback. 

Writing A Successful CTL Grant
Aug 27 3-4pm MT110 
This workshop will provide strategies for writing a successful grant application for the CTL/MCI grants.  

Collaborate
Aug 28 2-3pm MT110
Collaborate is a web conferencing software that can be used for student presentations, live lectures, virtual office hours, and group work. This workshop discusses how to create a Collaborate room in D2L, how to add and manage attendees for the room, and how to manage archived room recordings, and  surveys main tools available in Collaborate

Concept Mapping
Sep 3 10-11am MT110
Interested in how to use concept mapping/mind mapping to engage your students in meaningful learning? This workshop will introduce you to a piece of free concept mapping software and possible instructional strategies. 

Monday, August 18, 2014

Funding and Award Opportunities: CTL Grants

Hi folks!

The Center for Teaching and Learning is pleased to announce that its call for grant proposals is now open.   The CTL will award grants that average between $500-$750 for travel, speakers, or projects that demonstrably improve some facet of teaching or student learning at USD.  Please note that grant monies must be spent by May 1, 2015.  The submission deadline is 5pm (Central) September 8, 2014.  Award announcements are expected on or before October 3, 2014.!  Please contact Bruce Kelley, Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at 677-5411 or at Bruce.Kelley@usd.edu if you have any questions about this call for proposals.

Click on this link to browse the formal call.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Fall 2014 CTL event

Welcome back! At CTL we have a series of exciting events and workshops for you! All our old and new friends, please come and join us!

(click on the images to zoom in)




Wednesday, August 6, 2014

CTL Reading Group

Hi folks, we are pleased to announce that the CTL reading group’s book is now available.  We will be reading Maryellen Weimer’s Inspired College Teaching:  A Career-Long Resource for Professional Growth.  Times that the reading group will meet are listed below.  New for this year, we will focus on Weimer’s book both Fall and Spring semester (it’s that good!), reading chapters 1-6 during the fall, and chapters 7-10 in the spring.

Dr. Weimer examines faculty life and teaching from beginning to end, and shows how a career-long quest for great teaching can be exciting and fulfilling.  As always, books are free.  The chapters in this book are fairly self-contained, so faculty may sign up to participate both fall and spring semesters or just one or the other.  When you respond to sign up, please let us know if you prefer the Tuesday, 3:30-4:30 time or the Wednesday, 9:00-10:00 time (dates are below).  Participants may switch back and forth as needed to accommodate their schedules.  You can sign up by emailing us at CTL@usd.edu or by calling 605-677-5411

CTL Reading Group dates and times:

First Fall meeting (Chapters 1-2)
Tues, Sept 16, 3:30-4:30                  MUC East Lounge (227)
Wed, Sept 17, 9:00-10:00                MUC 216

Second Fall meeting (Chapters 3-4)
Tues, Oct 14, 3:30-4:30pm              MUC 216
Wed, Oct 15, 9:00-10:00                  MUC 216

Third Fall Meeting (Chapters 5-6)
Tues, Nov 4, 3:30-4:30                     MUC 216
Wed, Nov 5, 9:00-10:00                   MUC 216

First Spring meeting (Chapters 7-8)
Tues, Jan 27, 3:30-4:30                    MUC 216
Wed, Jan 28, 9:00-10:00                  MUC 216

Second Spring meeting (Chapters 9-10)
Tues, Feb 24, 3:30-4:30                   MUC 216
Wed, Feb 25, 9:00-10:00                 MUC 216


   


Upcoming D2L Workshops: August 11-22

Hi folks, as we approach the beginning of the fall semester (where did the summer go?)  now is a great time to come in to the CTL and brush up on your technology skills.  We continue to offer 1:1 assistance on pedagogical technology, and are offering the workshops listed below during the next two weeks.

You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu). 

What’s new in D2L
When: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 10-11am
Where: MT110
This course will show you all the new features with the most recent D2L upgrade. Comparisons will be made between the previous version of D2L and the new version of D2L. 

D2L1
When: Tuesday, August 19, 2014 2-3pm
Where: MT110
This introductory course will instruct you with on overview of D2L, including how to access and activate a course, how to customize your course, and how to manage course content.

D2L2
When: Wednesday, August 20, 2014 2-3pm
Where: MT110
This class explains how to set up and manage your gradebook, how to enter and export grades, and how to utilize the classlist for emailing students and viewing user progress.

D2L3
When: Thursday, August 21, 2014   2-3pm
Where: MT110
This course will teach you how to use communication tools in D2L, including course calendar, news item, pager, and discussion.

D2L4
When: Friday, August 22, 2014 2-3pm
Where: MT110
This course will discuss the purpose and use of the Dropbox tool and how to create, edit, and grade a quiz.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

D2L series

Come and join us next week for a feast of D2L workshop series! 
You may register for either of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu). 

D2L1
When: Monday, August 4, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This introductory course will instruct you with on overview of D2L, including how to access and activate a course, how to customize your course, and how to manage course content.

D2L2
When: Tuesday, August 5, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This class explains how to set up and manage your gradebook, how to enter and export grades, and how to utilize the classlist for emailing students and viewing user progress.

D2L3
When: Wednesday, August 6, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This course will teach you how to use communication tools in D2L, including course calendar, news item, pager, and discussion.

D2L4
When: Thursday, August 7, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This course will discuss the purpose and use of the Dropbox tool and how to create, edit, and grade a quiz.

D2L5
When:Friday, August 8, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Where: MT110
This course explains the user progress features of D2L, including: student statistics for discussions, content and dropboxes, as well as quiz analytics.


Thursday, July 24, 2014

Copyright and Fair use

How does copyright apply to the courses I teach? How to avoid copyright pitfalls when using media and other materials in your online course?
Hope this presentation prepared by our university librarians and Eric Mosterd from Center for Teaching and Learning could be of help!


Invitation to Participate in USD's First MOOC on course design

Hi folks, 

The CTL is excited to offer you a brand new way to learn about teaching.  “Don’t Panic!  The Professor’s Guide to Teaching:  Course Design” is a four-week MOOC that will help participants develop interesting, engaging classes that will provide students with opportunities for truly significant learning.  Information for this course may be found at  https://www.canvas.net/courses/don-t-panic-the-professor-s-guide-to-teaching-course-design .  The course will run from September 8 through October 7.  We anticipate that successful completion will take about 2 hours a week.  Participants who finish the course within the specified guidelines will receive a Certificate of Completion.

Although this MOOC is available worldwide, we have developed it specifically as a way to help USD distance faculty and graduate students.  We will host additional on-campus “meet-ups”, and are always available to you for greater information or 1:1 pedagogical and technological assistance.

This is an exciting first for the CTL, and we look forward to sharing our experiences with the rest of the university community.

Sincerely,


Bruce (and the whole CTL Team!)