Wednesday, December 10, 2014

January 8-9 CTL Workshop on Native Student Success Registration now open!

The Center for Teaching and Learning warmly invites you to a very special event January 8-9.  We are hosting a 2-day workshop on Native American Higher Education Student Success.  This workshop will take place in the Neuharth Media Center, and features Michael Fire, Ph.D, and a team of researchers:

Michael Fire, Ph.D., MPH, RN is an elder of the Cheyenne Arapaho Tribe of Oklahoma, a retired military officer, and former Chief of Staff of the Oklahoma Area Office for Indian Health Services.  He brings a lifetime of experience as a Native American educator, health administrator, and clinical practitioner.

Nancy Fire, Ed.D. is a Faculty Development Specialist at the University of North Texas, whose work is focused on integrating cultural and life experiences into learning, and about virtual learning and Native American students.

Amy Fann, Ph.D. has focused her research on college access within American Indian communities.  Her postdoctoral research has been funded through the University of California and looks at the role of higher education in advancing tribal economic development and self-determination, and tribally designed higher education initiatives.

Registration details are below.  The schedule is as follows:

Workshop on Native American Higher Education Student Success
Context:  This workshop is framed by two streams of action.  The first is the continuing conversation that the University of South Dakota has been having for many years on how to best serve Native students.  The second is the CTL's commitment to Inclusive Excellence, which is our determination to (among other things) establish inclusive habits of teaching and learning.  Undergirding all of this is my belief that as we improve our ability to understand and teach Native students, we improve our ability to serve all of our students.

January 8 (Day 1)
 4:00-4:15:  Consecration/blessing of learning space (Gene Thin Elk)
 4:15-5:00pm Keynote:  Native American Higher Education Student Success:  Presentation and Q and A (Amy Fann)

January 9 (Day 2):
9:00-10:30  Talking with your Native American Students:  Panel and discussion (Michael Fire)

10:30-10:40 Break

10:40-12:00: What Research Tells Us about Native American Student Learning using Native Ways of Knowing (NWOK):  Presentation/Activities and Q & A (Nancy Fire)

12:00-1:15:  Lunch and discussion:  Our Ways of Knowing:  Reflecting on Our Own Ways of Learning and Understanding (facilitated by Nancy Fire).  Lunch provided for all who pre-register.

1:15-2:30:  Experiential Learning and Incorporating NWOK in assignments (Nancy Fire)

2:30-2:40:  Break

2:40-3:45:  Purposeful Student-faculty Interactions: Becoming an Integral Part of your Students’ Learning (Michael Fire)

3:45-4:00 Closing: Blessing (Gene Thin Elk)

We strongly encourage you to attend as much of this as possible.  Drop ins are welcome!

You may register for this event by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  Only those who are pre-registered may participate in the lunch session on Friday.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  Due to the highly interactive nature of this workshop, it will not be offered through Collaborate.  The CTL is also using a new card-swipe system to track attendance, please bring your faculty ID card!

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

CTL Workshops: D2L Grades, Online Faculty Forum, and Native Student Success

Hi folks!  We have a wonderful lineup of holiday training events through these next weeks of December, and we continue to offer 1:1 assistance on D2L and other pedagogical technologies.  

You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).  The CTL is also using a new card-swipe system to track attendance, please bring your faculty ID card!


Friday, November 14, 2014

CTL Workshops: Turnitin, International Student Employment, and more!

Hi folks!  We have a wonderful lineup of events for you next week and the first week of December, and we continue to offer 1:1 assistance on D2L and other pedagogical technologies.  You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).  The CTL is also using a new card-swipe system to track attendance, please bring your faculty ID card!

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Faculty Mentoring

Created by: Ethan Villeneuve, Graduate Associate at The Center for Teaching and Learning

Edited by: Brooke Doty, Tech Fellow at The Center for Teaching and Learning

New faculty members are in a transitional period in their life where mentorship can be crucial to their success. Any new job requires a specific set of skills, responsibilities, training, familiarization of one’s surrounding, and knowledge of guidelines. An instructor is no different. Being a new instructor can seem overwhelming, and having someone who is accessible to be a trusted guide through the beginning of one’s instructional career is enormously beneficial.

Being a mentor is a multifaceted time consuming activity. With extensive knowledge in teaching, research, service, and familiarity of institutional expectations, an experienced instructor obviously cannot bequeath all this information to a new instructor in one sitting. New things will always come up and new questions will always need to be answered. As a mentor, you will play many roles. Research suggests four types of roles that predict the essence of a good mentor:

The Friend interacts with the mentee socially, providing advice about people and helping with personal problems. The second type, Career Guide, promotes the development of the mentee's research, inclusion in a network of colleagues, and his/her professional visibility. The Information Source provides information about formal and informal expectations for promotion and tenure, publication outlets, and committee work. The Intellectual Guide promotes an equal relationship, collaborates with the mentee on research or publications, and provides constructive criticism and feedback. (Sands, R., Parson, L., & Duane, J., 1991, p. 189)

You may only be engaging in one, two, or maybe even all of these roles. It depends on the needs of the mentee and the mentors strengths. It is key to remember each mentor has different qualities and these roles only play a part in the mentor mentee relationship Other things have to be taken into consideration like the personalities of both parties. Remember, these roles are important, and you definitely want to keep them in mind, but I want to specifically touch on teaching or instruction in relation to mentoring.

In regards to teaching, a mentor needs to assist in their mentee’s goals in the classroom. A new instructor may have many questions such as, “What technological resources are available to support instruction and how can professors access them?” or “Who evaluates faculty members and when does this occur?” Other than answering important questions, a mentor can aid in planning classes and sitting in on their mentee’s class. Feedback should be formative, offering constructive feedback and helpful tips. A mentor can also give materials and strategies related to effective teaching (Gaskin, L. P., Lumpkin, A., & Tennant, L. K., 2003, p. 50).

Of course, there is much more that can be covered about mentoring, and you may have some questions specific to a number of different topics. A great resource to utilize in your mentor-mentee relationship is Ball State’s “New Faculty Mentoring Guide.” Also, do not forget to direct your new colleagues to the Center for Teaching and Learning! There are many resources available here. We do training and support of academic technologies to pedagogy among many other things as well.

References

  1. Ball State University. (n.d.).  New Faculty Mentoring Guide. Retrieved from http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/educationalexcellence/resources/facultymentors
  2. Gaskin, L. P., Lumpkin, A., & Tennant, L. K. (2003). Mentoring new faculty in higher education. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 74(8), 49-53.
  3. Sands, R., Parson, L., & Duane, J. (1991). Faculty mentoring faculty in a public university. The Journal of Higher Education, 62(2), 174-193.

CTL workshops Nov 10-21: MOOCs, Google Docs, and more!

Hi folks!  We have a wonderful lineup of events for you next week, and we continue to offer 1:1 assistance on D2L and other pedagogical technologies.  You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).  The CTL is also using a new card-swipe system to track attendance, please bring your faculty ID card!

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

CTL Nov3-Nov14: Assistive Technologies, OneNote and more!

Hi folks!  We have a wonderful lineup of events for you next week, and we continue to offer 1:1 assistance on D2L and other pedagogical technologies.  You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).  The CTL is also using a new card-swipe system to track attendance, please bring your faculty ID card!

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Twitter in the Classroom

Created by: Ryan McCarty Graduate Associate and Molly Cahoy, Tech Fellow at The Center For Teaching and Learning

Twitter has rapidly emerged as one of the most popular forms of social media available today. From following your favorite celebrities to updating your friends about your day, Twitter has a wide variety of social functions. Twitter also has many different capabilities that can be employed in a business or in a classroom setting. One of the most valuable but underutilized set of features available on Twitter, is its benefit in the classroom. This post will highlight some of the most common applications of Twitter in a university setting and some unique ways to engage your students with Twitter.

Social Media and more specifically Twitter, has begun to play an important role in the education system. “Nearly 80 percent of faculty members are using social media in some way, according to a recent survey of nearly 2,000 college faculty” (Lytle, 2011).


TeachHub.com compiled a list of 50 ways to use Twitter in the classroom. Here are a few from the list that could be immediately utilized by faculty here at the University of South Dakota. First, is tweeting about upcoming assignments and due dates. “One of the simplest ways that teachers can use Twitter in the classroom involves setting up a feed dedicated exclusively to due dates, tests or quizzes” (Miller, 2005). The reality is that most students understand and frequently use social media, so it won’t be much of an adjustment for them to use social media for academic purposes. Twitter can also serve as a more reliable and permanent way to inform students about changes to syllabus and other relevant pieces of course news.

Similar to updating different elements of the course, encouraging students to use Twitter to coordinate assignments is another useful tool. “Rather than keeping up with an e-mail train, students can use Twitter to collaborate on different projects and keep a quick reference on any changes” (Miller, 2005). Twitter can provide students a way to instantly communicate and update their group members on a user-friendly interface.

Finally, Twitter provides a resource for students to immerse themselves in their area of study. Depending on a student’s major or area of interest, they can follow relevant news outlets and journalists, they can keep up to date on corporations and the stock market and they can remain knowledgeable on the current national and international political climate. Students can even begin to use Twitter as a way to share their knowledge, experiences and opinions as they progress as scholars, by tweeting their ideas, re-tweeting posts they find interesting and tweeting at people they wish to converse with.
 

Overall the uses and benefits for Twitter in the classroom are nearly endless. Although it may seem ominous, making the leap to incorporating social media in your classroom has the potential to not only enhance your students learning experience, but your teaching efficiency as well.

If you have any other questions regarding Twitter, please refer to our Tutorial about Twitter o
r our former blog posting on Twitter. Thanks!


References


Miller, Samantha. "50 Ways to Use Twitter in the Classroom." Teach Hub.com. 10 Oct. 2005. Web. http://www.teachhub.com/50-ways-use-twitter-classroom.

Llorenz, Jason. "Ten Steps to Using Twitter in the College Classroom." Huffington Post. 25 Aug. 2014. Web. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jason-a-llorenz/ten-steps-to-using-twitte_b_5692021.html.

Lytle, Ryan. "5 Unique Uses of Twitter in the Classroom." U.S News and World Report. 24 May 2011. Web. 
http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2011/05/24/5-unique-uses-of-twitter-in-the-classroom

Monday, October 20, 2014

CTL Workshops: Programmatic Assessment, Social Media, Academic Job Search, and more!

Greetings! The CTL is offering some fantastic events next week. You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).  The CTL is also using a new card-swipe system to track attendance, please bring your USD ID card!

Thursday, October 16, 2014

CTL workshops: Assistive Technologies, D2L and more!

Hi folks!  We have a wonderful lineup of events for you next week, and we continue to offer 1:1 assistance on D2L and other pedagogical technologies.  You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).  The CTL is also using a new card-swipe system to track attendance, please bring your faculty ID card!

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

CTL workshops Oct 14-24

Hi folks!  We have a wonderful lineup of events for you next week, and we continue to offer 1:1 assistance on D2L and other pedagogical technologies.  You may register for any of these events by emailing us at (ctl@usd.edu) or calling us at 605-677-5411.  If you need accommodations to participate in any of these events, contact disability services at 605 677-6389 at least 48 hours in advance.  If you would like to attend any of these workshops (but not web seminars) by Collaborate, please let us know 48 hours in advance by emailing (ctl@usd.edu).  The CTL is also using a new card-swipe system to track attendance, please bring your faculty ID card!


Monday, October 6, 2014

Free mobile apps for teaching, learning

Using smartphones for teaching and learning?  Here is a list of free mobile apps that are commonly used in postsecondary for teaching, learning, and productivity. Check and see if you are interested in any!

http://wcet.wiche.edu/learn/fall-apps-2014